Wolgast Restoration Blog Page

How Third Party Administrators Have Shaped Our Restoration Services

Posted by Cory Sursely on Mon, Jan 21, 2019 @ 02:14 PM

Third Party Administrator Programs Provide Excellent Framework for Restoration Customer Service

Restoration ConstructionLove them or dislike them, our insurance restoration business model has been molded by Third Party Administrators (TPAs) from the onset of our business plan.  This was intentional to simplify our new restoration service division in a complex industry to satisfy all end users, i.e. insurance companies, and policy holders. 

We recognized that the TPA programs as a whole offer the frame work for high levels of customer service for all entities that we serve.  Our systems are based on the TPA frame work, so whether we are involved under one of their programs, or work that we do as directly hired by an insured, our service will be the same consistent level of quality.

What we have gleaned from TPA models:

  • Cost Efficiency and Predetermined Pricing – One of the reasons TPAs were originally developed was to help make claims more cost efficient. We use the same estimating software as the insurance carrier, so our pricing matches.  This takes out any discrepancies or a source of discontent with the insured.  It also eliminates the need for a policy holder to waste precious time shopping for a restoration company based on the price.
  • Improving Service Time – TPAs have strict reporting requirements to track response times and work progress. Our parent company, Wolgast Corporation, a 70 year old commercial contractor, has a reputation for getting buildings built quickly.  We draw from their experience and processes to set milestone dates and ensure that we’re efficient and meet deadlines established at the start of the project.
  • High Level Customer Service – In our program work by TPAs, we are regulated as to how quickly we respond to a claim, how quickly we provide estimates and how quickly we complete our work; all things that are important to the affected policy holder. This has helped us to provide excellent customer service to policy holder’s, many of whom have sent us letters of goodwill stating their appreciation during their time of need.  We have taken this a step further with sensitivity training for our first responder staff members to help instill in them that they don’t just need to quickly expedite critical restoration processes, but also that they need to provide emotional support to the insured during a highly sensitive time.
  • Maintaining Qualified and Well Trained Staff – Each of our staff members have been trained and certified in their area of expertise, as well as have had background checks prior to entering an insured’s property. This is how we can confidently comply with TPA programs as well as reduce risks of deviation from our reputable service.

We continually hone our processes to continue to improve our speed, efficiency, customer service, and staff development, as we speculate that TPAs will continue to expect more.  This is how it’s been since the inception of Wolgast Restoration and how we set ourselves apart.

Check out these blogs:
How to Meet Expectations of Property Insurance Customers after a Disaster
Being What Agents and Adjusters Seek in a Restoration Company

How to Solve Your Biggest Problems with Property Content Recovery

Topics: business preparation, restoration, customer service

Preparing Your Business for Spring Flooding

Posted by Rich Droste on Mon, Mar 23, 2015 @ 10:20 AM

Flooded businessMichigan isn’t known for being at high-risk of disastrous flooding caused by heavy rains. But last August, Detroit experienced a record rainfall of 4.57 inches in one day. Some communities received more than 6 inches of rain. This unusual event was considered by many to be a 100-year flood, especially since the last rainfall of this magnitude occurred back in 1925. Detroit’s average rainfall for all of August is only 3 inches.

The water reached a height of 14 feet on some roadways. This event shut down major freeways, stranded hundreds of motorists and caused one death. This is especially disturbing, since it occurred during one of the driest months in Michigan.

Now that spring has arrived, we face the prospect of even more severe flooding from melting snow and spring rains. We saw record flooding in April of 2013 and some Michigan rivers have already flooded their banks this month.

The key to good flood preparation is to know and understand your hazards. Proximity to water is the number one risk factor to flooding. Flood maps, available from the National Flood Insurance program can help you to determine if your facility lies within a flood plain. Also, perform a thorough examination of your facility itself. Be sure all downspouts and drains are clear from debris and adequately direct water away from the foundation of the building. Over time, parking lots and landscaping can gradually deteriorate or erode, changing the way water flows and puddles on your property. If your property hasn’t been properly maintained or improved for several years, it is a good idea to hire an expert in these areas to perform a flood risk assessment.

While we are in the business of restoring property after a flood or disaster occurs, we feel it is important to make business owners aware of other damages, besides property, that a flood can inflict on their business. An event like the one last August may not have caused extensive property damage, but it did impact the infrastructure responsible for generating millions of dollars of daily revenue for the local communities and businesses.

Every business should have a contingency plan to minimize the impact such a disaster can have on their business, if the local infrastructure is compromised. This type of plan can include:

  • Creating alternative shipping and receiving routes.
  • Warning customers of possible delivery delays.
  • Having alternate or backup suppliers in place, in case your suppliers are affected by the same disaster.
  • Developing an emergency cash reserve fund to cover payroll, vendor contracts, mortgage payments, leases, etc.
  • Establishing an adequate line of credit in case you don’t have enough cash in your emergency fund.
  • Keeping a list of key contacts for those that provide administrative services for your business.
  • Evacuating critical documents and backing up electronic data files.
  • Protecting or removing vulnerable computers, equipment and machinery.
  • Setting up an off-site management and operations command post.
  • Creating an emergency communication channel and protocol for employees to report to managers.
Developing good relationships with public agencies and corporate partners can improve your ability to protect your business and return to normal after a disaster. Maintain a communication channel with community leaders, public safety agencies, government agencies, utility companies, insurance companies, and disaster restoration contractors. Working with outside agencies can be very beneficial, because they can provide you with a wealth of information to help you recover quickly from a disaster.

Topics: spring floods, business preparation, contingency plan